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Meet Sumo Robot, Prototype WD-02

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Interested in sumo robots but do not know how to start? Come meet my sumo robot prototype that has mostly all the information you need to make your own and compete. Well maybe...


Disclaimer: This project was built alongside my team school project (based on modifications). Please check-out the website, teamfalcon.sdsu.edu for further details. 


Project Specifications:
Skill Level: Intermediate
Focus: Electronics, Programming, Design
Estimated Cost: $150 - $250+
Estimated Time: 20hr+

Project Reasoning:

This section is based on the Project Specifications above. The first item concerning skill level is relative, but I would say it would be advanced if you truly do not understand any of the disciplines mentioned in focus. This project will test how well you can design with errors, program and visualize mechanically, and be able to solder and debug a circuit, sensors, parts, and more.


Alongside, Two Projects:

During my time at University, my team and I were designing the robot, and towards the end of the semester, I wanted to make my own since I am graduating. This meant that I probably cannot print PCBs (printed circuit boards) or print 3D parts anymore. So during the last two weeks (including finals week), I designed and made my own robot that had a similar base to the team robot, but with a uniquely different design. In the video below (or next sections), the team robot is the one using orange wheels, which are from JSumo, and my robot is using cheap rubber wheels. Initially, the original robot was supposed to have a flag; as you see on the other robot the flag is incorporated, but it is wobbly (the screw hole was a bit off for the servo on the chassis). My design for the 3D printed chassis had some minor miscalculations, but overall it still fits well. I have edited some parts, but the #M2 screws for the top chassis to top PCB still need to be realigned as it is off by about 2 cm. 


More Information:

Both robots have similar parts and almost the same code. You will be able to find the parts information, schematics, pictures, videos, and more about the other sumo robots at http://teamfalcon.sdsu.edu/home .

In case, in the future, if the website hosted at my school goes down, I will host it on my server with the same information since I made it and have the code. 


Video:

Here is a video about the whole process!

 

 


The Design:

When I designed the robot, I wanted it to be modular, meaning that you put pieces together like Lego blocks. I also wanted to be able to program the microcontroller while it is in the robot, so the middle front sensor is held in using pure tension because the wires are pushing against the seat in the top chassis. For the battery, servo, and side sensors, they are secured using heavy-duty velcro strips. More on the chassis, you can see that I painted it based on a certain character (with some modifications). I mean it's obvious once you get it, but probably the majority won't get it, but it doesn't matter. Back to what I was explaining, the bottom PCB has the power, motors, and edge sensors, while the top has the brains, servo, a button for modes, receiver, and enemy sensors. 


My Team Report:

Here is our team report if you are interested in the documentation on our sumo robot (about 25 pages), which was the one with orange wheels in the video.

Team Falcon Final Report


Download Project Files:

Firstly, if you want access to download the files, you must register to the website to download the files. I restricted it because I want to be sure that you actually care about how much work was put into it, and you can do a small favor in return.

If you want to see how the robot, Prototype WD-02, you can find all the files in our downloads or by clicking this link: Files

If you are having some trouble opening my files, you might have to either upgrade your software or downgrade depending on when you try opening these files (you know, time sensitivity). For Eagle PCB, I included the libraries I used and you should install them. Just Google how to install external libraries.  


Thank You:

Sumo robots are pretty fun and I learned a lot. Have a fantastic day and be well! 

Quick announcement, I'm shifting the content I release and make to be more focused on the career I want, but I will still retain all my hobbies (maybe) and be more mindful on my public image (even though it shouldn't matter).

 

Tags: Embedded Systems

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